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LoraHatesSpam

Lora Hates Spam

My rants and reviews

Currently reading

Before the Coffee Gets Cold
Toshikazu Kawaguchi, Geoffrey Trousselot
The Wolves of Venice
Alex Conner
Tales in Time: The Man Who Walked Home and Other Stories
Peter Crowther, Robert Silverberg, Harlan Ellison, Ray Bradbury, Lewis Padgett, Garry Douglas Kilworth, James Tiptree Jr., Charles de Lint, Spider Robinson, Jack Finney, L. Sprague de Camp, Brian W. Aldiss, H.G. Wells
Progress: 27/284pages
Black Sunday
Tola Rotimi Abraham
The Wood Burn Book
Rachel Strauss
Elemental Magic
Nigel Pennick
The Lost Queen
Signe Pike
Dragons & Mythical Creatures
Gerrie McCall, Chris McNab
The Truants
Kate [Samantha Weinberg] Westbrook
Hello, Again
Isabelle Broom

Don Quixote

Don Quixote - Roberto González Echevarría, John Rutherford, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

by Miguel de Cervantes

 

This is one of those Classics that I've meant to read for a very long time. To my great joy, it immediately covered familiar parts of the story that I had seen in films, though not entirely in the same order, and the writing was engaging and kept me interested in the exploits that have made this story so well known. At first.

 

There was the odd chapter where the author broke the fourth wall and wittered on about details in a way that newer authors can't get away with today, but in context of classic literature, it didn't detract too much.

 

Naturally a book can cover more adventures than the well known encounters that have been popularised by film and common knowledge. This gave me new material to read as well as things unfolding differently than I might have expected. Unfortunately, it went on and on until it actually became tedious to read. I put it aside for a while and went back to it, determined through sheer stubbornness to finish this book even if I had to do it one chapter at a time.

 

I've lost track of how long it's been. Certainly over a year. But I refused to DNF because it's a favourite theme and has made for some good movies. It's long, it's disjointed, tedious in parts, and still one of the most wonderful Classics ever written.